Paying Off for Consumers – the CFPB Is Getting the Job Done

Getting credit card companies to cough up more than $1.8 billion in refunds to consumers they had cheated. Directing mortgage lenders to limit charges and stop making loans that borrowers can’t afford. Cracking down on “last dollar” scams that collect up-front fees from financially desperate people for help that is never actually delivered. Establishing a consumer complaint database to track financial market trends and help consumers get individual problems addressed

All that and more is the doing, so far, of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was created just four years ago by the Dodd-Frank financial reform law, and could not begin to wield its authority until a year after that.

The idea for such an agency was put forward in 2007 by then-professor (now Senator) Elizabeth Warren. At the time, as she pointed out, consumer protection in the financial marketplace was a responsibility scattered across multiple agencies, and treated by none as a priority. Key regulators lost sight not only of consumer safety but of systemic safety too, tolerating and even encouraging many of the reckless and deceptive practices that fueled the financial and economic meltdown of 2008.

The big banks and financial companies opposed the bureau as a concept, and they don’t much care for the reality, either. From the start, the bureau has been the target of ferocious attacks from industry lobbyists and their too many friends on Capitol Hill, who have concocted a series of bogus controversies in an effort to depict the agency as out of control.

What it all boils down to is that, unlike some of the watchdogs the financial industry has faced in the past, the bureau has been energetically doing the job it was meant to do: bringing basic standards of safety and transparency to the markets for credit cards, mortgages, student loans, auto loans, checking accounts, debt collection and other common financial products and services.

The bureau has the authority to write rules, supervise a broad range of financial companies, carry out enforcement actions, educate consumers and analyze relevant patterns of industry behavior. In its work to date, it has made fruitful use of all these powers.

In the mortgage market, for example, the bureau has issued rules that discourage high fees and deceptively structured loans, in addition to requiring verification of every borrower’s ability to repay before a loan can be issued. Its new rules, which took effect in January, hold the potential to help save borrowers and the economy from another wave of dangerous and unsustainable lending.

The bureau has also taken a number of noteworthy enforcement actions, producing refunds and fines of more than $4.8 billion so far. These actions, often coming on the heels of multi-agency investigations, have targeted illegal kickbacks for mortgage referrals, unfair billing practices and deceptive telemarketing and sales tactics, among other offenses. More than 15 million consumers have received some restitution, while countless others have benefited from settlement provisions requiring companies to change their practices and from the deterrent effect of serious enforcement.

Another important bureau accomplishment has been to create a complaint system and database where consumers can go with problems involving credit cardsstudent loansbank accounts and servicesdebt collection and more. The agency’s Office of Consumer Response has already received more than 400,000 consumer complaints. Besides helping consumers get monetary relief (such as refunded fees) and non-monetary relief (such as errors fixed on credit reports or an end to harassing phone calls from debt collectors), the complaint system provides the bureau with a reservoir of precious information. Complaints can help highlight repeat problems or law-breaking, and identify important gaps in consumer understanding, letting the agency know where it needs to focus its educational, supervisory, enforcement or rulemaking efforts to improve specific markets, products or practices. Members of the public can use the complaint data both to evaluate different companies and to find out if their personal experiences reflect a wider pattern.

By law, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has a special duty to protect seniors, students and military personnel. In its efforts to fulfill that mandate, the bureau has released important reports on student lending and set up an online tool called “Paying for College,” which makes it easier for people to compare financial aid options and figure out a successful repayment strategy. Its Office of Older Americans has gone after scammers who prey on senior citizens. Its Office of Servicemember Affairs has worked with other agencies to add extra protections for military personnel in rules and enforcement actions involving mortgages, payday loans, student loans and debt collection.

In its short life, the bureau has already done much to vindicate the trust of the hundreds of consumer, civil rights, labor, faith and other groups that banded together to insist that such an agency be part of the Dodd-Frank package. But it’s just a start. Plenty of important work lies ahead on payday loans, student loans, prepaid cards and debt collection, among other trouble zones of the financial marketplace. And as the agency takes on industry self-interest in these areas, it will continue to face intense opposition from those in the financial world and from legislators under their sway.

new poll commissioned by Americans for Financial Reform and the Center for Responsible Lending shows overwhelming, bipartisan support for the concept of an agency focused on protecting financial consumers and cracking down on deceptive and abusive practices.

Now it’s important to raise public awareness of this still-young agency, so more people can benefit from its complaint system, educational tools and other resources – and so the voices of the many who value the bureau’s work can continue to be louder than the voices of the few who want it to go away.

– Rebecca Thiess

Originally published on USNews.com

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