What should be done to stop banks like Wells Fargo from scamming us?

Image via Peg Hunter (CC BY-NC 2.0) / Cropped from original

Wells Fargo’s CEO John Stumpf deserves every bit of the anger that the Senate Banking Committee directed at him for leading Wells Fargo while it created more than 2 million fake deposit and credit-card accounts, and then charged unknowing customers for them.

Stumpf has tried to lay the blame at the feet of workers. But this was not the behavior of a few out-of-control workers. The problem was systematic, and it followed from Wells Fargo’s use of high-stakes sales quotas for its employees. As the Los Angeles City Attorney’s office explained in its lawsuit, these quotas were often impossible to fulfill, and yet employees who fell short were often fired.

But Wells Fargo’s failure points to a broader problem. After all, this is hardly the first time Wells has faced scrutiny for illegal acts. As Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) pointed out, this is only one of 39 enforcement actions that Wells has faced in the last ten years.

Wells Fargo has racked up over $10 billion in fines for offenses from racial discrimination in mortgage lending, tomortgage fraud, to violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

So what should be done to stop banks from scamming us? Americans for Financial Reform has five specific proposals.

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The best-paid hedge fund managers made $13 billion last year

That’s enough to end family homelessness in America

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Image credit: Pictures of Money (CC BY 2.0)

The 25 highest paid hedge fund managers in America took home $13 billion in compensation last year, according to Reuters.

They’re able to make such astronomical amounts thanks in part to the many loopholes in our financial regulation. So-called “activist” hedge funds, for example, abuse lax securities laws to gain large stakes in public companies, and then demand cost-cutting, layoffs, and more debt. These moves enrich the hedge funds while often dooming the companies they acquire.

To top it off, hedge funds are costly investments whose performance often just mirrors the stock market overall, despite charging exorbitant fees. In 2015, those fees added up to a cool $13 billion in compensation for the 25 managers at the top of Reuters’ list.

It’s hard to wrap your head around a number like $13 billion. To make it a little easier, here are a few comparisons — inspired by a report from the Coalition on Human Needs.

$13 billion could end family homelessness for ten years

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Image credit: Lavin Han (CC BY-ND 2.0)

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has said that it would take $11 billion over ten years to provide housing subsidies to 550,000 more families — an amount that could effectively end family homelessness, since in January 2015, HUD found that 564,708 people were homeless on a given night.

And we’d still have $2 billion left over.
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